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Posts Tagged ‘style’

and just to be fair to a different brand…
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I don’t know exactly what was going on here…maybe it was a joke?! But starting with the thick grey ‘scarf’ that looks more like a suit jacket draped over the jacket she’s already sporting, and on to the blue suede shoes that might have been cool in theory if they hadn’t been so pointed, and concluding with the too short, saggy bottom drop waisted gangsta-style bluejeans that simply aren’t appropriate on someone so thin and tall… well
Lucy Chadwick has some ‘splainin to do! lol

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MV Agusta Cilindri.

A classic Italian racer. While a 3-cylinder engine was not exactly a novelty (others had experimented with this configuration) it was undoubtedly the first to achieve such brilliant performance. A full 92 HP at 13,500 RPM, lightness and excellent handling made this 500 the most successful of the MV stable. Following its 1966 debut, it won 7 consecutive world championships from 1967 to 1973 with G. Agostini. That was no easy feat. Wouldn’t you love to ride this machine on a race track?


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Apparently Karl Lagerfeld also loves the classics, as he is seen with a version of this machine here. What a bike; what a guy!
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Debra is one of several older women Ari Seth Cohen interviewed during the making of his current book “Advanced Style”. As you can see here, Debra’s personal style and sense of confidence enlivens any setting, and her sunny smile and sense of humor makes any item seem haute couture.

My whole life I’ve been opposed to black because I figure there’s such a fabulous range of color, why does one have to go to black?

“if you can’t wear something upside down, inside out, and backwards, it’s not worth owning!”

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ADVANCED STYLE.

Ari Seth Cohen has written a book, proving couture worn by women over sixty can be just as, if not more stylish, than that worn by younger women. Here are some examples of stylish women flaunting their sense of style.

I’d also love to flaunt these looks, if I could afford to! I guess bravery comes with age.

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Gene Matras pen and ink illustration work

Aphelion Art scratchboard works by Cathy Sheeter

3Kicks Fine Art Studios by Matt Marchant

“morning drawings” by Gabriela Vainsencher

“One hundred awesome paintings in one year” by Anna Judd

Julia Sverchuk’s line drawings

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is “pop art” Art?

To me, it is the creator or originator of an idea who has done the work; reprooductions of an artistic ‘style’ are not the equivalent of the idea.

There is a distinction there, because so much of the methodology of today’s art is reproducible through software applications or mechanical means, especially in the world of graphics.

Stylizing one’s work to be representational of a trend may be functionally appropriate, and useful in mass reproduction, in fields of design and decoration and illustration. It is the origin of the terms “popular” “trendy” and “fashionable” to take on a particular form. However, it’s not the same thing as “art”, in my book. It may be “artistic” and “graphic.” But not “fine”…

For example, Daniel Mena is a graphics artist who has incorporated the feeling of Andy Warhol’s “pop” in his representations. We have the cut-out print designs, the stylization, all reproducible graphic iconography….Yet I discern to real “meaningful” quality to his body of work. He’s got the technique, and run with it. But that is not the same as Warhol’s original experimentation, built up through a foundation of a career as an illustrator. It incorporates elements of Warhol’s styling, but not his meaning.

Whereas the work of another artist, Inka Essenhigh, may have the stylized form of a Dr. Seuss cartoon, she creates images of individuality imbued with symbolic references, worven together to yield narrative that is highly meaningful to the careful observer. There is no such meaning found in pop art, which is merely a stylish shell.

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