Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘legend’ Category

once every 2737 years

once every 2737 years

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

The pyramids of Giza in Egypt are currently aligned in exactly the same manner as three of the planets in our solar system, Saturn, Venus, and Mercury are aligned as of 12/3/12, 18 days before the famous and popular 12/21/12 which is the end of the Mayan calendar.

(This has been calculated using specialized software like Stellarium).

The planetary alignment on December 3, 2012 with the pyramids of Giza, occurs only once every 2737 years.

For more interesting stuff about the conjunction of dates, stars and the ancient calendar, you can read a related story, “2112 Decoded” at World Mysteries.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

reposted from “Chanel: A Lion in Tweed”
__________________________________________________________________________________________________

Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel’s headstone in Lausanne, Switzerland


____________________________________________________________________________________________________

it is only fair to pay equal respect to the woman and legend behind the brand that has single-handedly made quilted bags and ballerina flats universal fashion must-haves. Gabrielle, or “Coco” as she preferred, was a complex and complicated woman. Or, atleast, that is how she is portrayed in the three (yes, three) books that came out just this season. Having only read one so far, I can promise that Coco’s romances are explored just as thoroughly as the rumors which surrounded her life between the covers of Justine Picardie’s Coco Chanel: The Legend and The Life. Between the captivating photos of her past and sketches by Karl Lagerfeld, Picardie’s writing makes for an illuminating tale of a woman torn between two lives: fashion designer and wartime woman.

My personal fascination has been focused on Coco’s years in Switzerland. I’ve spent the past two months living in this country known for the Alps and fondue, and can’t help but imagine what it must have been like 65 years ago when the designer frequented the shores of Lac Léman. As Picardie notes in her book, Chanel once said she felt “free as a bird” when visiting Switzerland; her unsmudged red lipstick and conservative clothing concealing a life of lovers, flings, family drama, and a token best friend with a drug problem.

Following her death at the Ritz in Paris on January 10, 1971, Coco was buried at the Cimetière du Bois-de-Vaux in Lausanne. The turnout for her burial appeared meager in photos, as a formal, more-sizable ceremony had been conducted in Paris two weeks prior. Her gravestone is recognizable by five lions that appear across the top of her headstone; Coco’s astrological sign was Leo, something that defined her to the end. Today, greenery in the formation of her name, “Coco”, is perfectly placed across the area where her body rests. Next week, it will be 41 years since she passed.

As written in Picardie’s pages, Chanel once said to Paul Morand,
“I would make a very bad dead person, because once I was put under, I would grow restless and would think only of returning to earth and starting all over again.” I’ll keep my eye on her plot.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________

reposted from “Chanel: A Lion in Tweed”

Read Full Post »

St. Eustace and the stag by Pisanello

LEGEND OF SAINT EUSTACE

Saint Eustace, also known as Eustachius or Eustathius, was a legendary Christian martyr who lived in the 2nd century AD. Prior to his conversion to Christianity, Eustace was a Roman general named Placidus, who served the emperor Trajan. While hunting a stag in Tivoli near Rome, Placidus saw a vision of Jesus between the stag’s antlers. He was immediately converted, had himself and his family baptized, and changed his name to Eustace (Greek: Ευστάθιος Eustathios, “well stable”, or Ευστάχιος, Eustachios, “rich crop”).

A series of calamities followed to test his faith: his wealth was stolen; his servants died of a plague; when the family took a sea voyage, the ship’s captain kidnapped Eustace’s wife Theopista; and as Eustace crossed a river with his two sons Agapius and Theopistus, the children were taken away by a wolf and a lion. Like Job, Eustace lamented but did not lose his faith.

He was then quickly restored to his former prestige and reunited with his family; but when he demonstrated his new faith by refusing to make a pagan sacrifice, the emperor, Hadrian, condemned Eustace, his wife, and his sons to be roasted to death inside a bronze statue of a bull or an ox, in the year AD 118.

The saint is honored on the calendar of the Melkite Catholics on December 13, as the “Commemoration of the Holy Martyrs Eustrates, Auxentius, Eugene, Mardarius, Orestes and the Virgin Lucia.” He is also commemorated in the Orthodox Church, on September 20. The d’Afflitto dynasty, one of the oldest princely families in Italy, claims to be the direct descendant of Saint Eustace.

He is one of the patron saints of Madrid, Spain. Scenes from the story, especially Eustace kneeling before the stag, became a popular subject of medieval religious art. Early artistic depictions of the legend include a wall painting at Canterbury Cathedral and stained glass windows at the Cathedral of Chartres. There is a Church of Saint Eustace in Paris. And the island of Sint Eustatius in the Caribbean Netherlands is named after him.

Probably the saint is currently best known for his cross-and-stag symbol being featured on bottles of Jägermeister. This is related to his status as patron of hunters; jägermeisters were senior foresters and gamekeepers in the German civil service at the time of the drink’s introduction in 1935.

In 1661, Kircher discovered the ruins of a church said to have been constructed by Constantine on the site of Saint Eustace’s vision of Jesus Christ in a stag’s horns. He raised money to pay for the church’s reconstruction as the Santuario della Mentorella, and his heart was buried in the church on his death.

Read Full Post »

As an adendum to the story of Gobekli Tepe, and its relationship as the world’s first known antediluvian site, it is interesting to learn that several ancient civilizations have mythology describing the magnetic polar shift which may have preceded the earthquakes which caused the Great Flood.

Excerpt: –Alfred Hamori “The origin of the Sumerians and the great flood”

The pole shift and the freezing of the old homelands, as told in Sumerian, Finn-Ugor and Iranic myths

These are the precursors to the events which eventually lead to the great floods, that affected the whole planet.

The Sumerians left behind legends about the gods and their early settlement as told in the “Barton Tablets”. These according to Christian O’brian “The Genius of the Few”, tell of a land “of the gods” which at one time became frozen and cold, and eventually forced them south. I consider these myths about the Sumerian “gods” to be ancient recollections of very early events remembered for millenniums, that actually happened to the ancestors of the Sumerians, about their old homelands in the frozen land areas like Siberia. They called this place “Karsag”. I believe that this freezing was caused by the shift in the North Pole 13,000 years ago, which plunged Central Siberia from a temperate climate to a polar climate, where the ground a few feet from the surface never thaws out. Scientists have found frozen mammoths in Siberia, whose stomachs were still filled with plants that are known to live only in temperate climates, and not in the arctic regions.

Some groups trapped in this new harsh climate after the pole shift were so decimated by the freezing Siberian weather that they probably reverted to a primitive subsistence, which they could never hope to recover from in their new harsh surroundings. The lucky ones further away were able to move and look for new lands in more favorable climate, such as the great southern lakes like the Black Sea, Caspean Sea, Lake Baikal areas.

Similar stories are also told by the Californian Indians of the Penuitan language group, who are believed by some linguists to be descendant of the Ob-Ugrians of North Western Siberia, who are a branch of the FinnoUgrian language group. The ancestors of these Penuitan Indians crossed the Berring Straights and traveled here from the north. These Indians also believe that their gods come from and live in the polar regions. Their language has many common words with Ugrian and FinnUgor languages to which Finnish, Hungarian, Estonian, Lappish, Samoyedic, and several other minority languages of Russia belong. The language group is scattered from the Pacific to central and northern Europe.

Historic linguists also claim that the ancestors of the early Iranians

Sumerian Samarra bowl

also lived in close proximity to the Ugrians (Hungarians, Vogul and Ostjak languages), based on some common early words. According to ancient Hungarian legends there was an intermarriage with the Iranic Alan people. It is no surprise then that Iranian myths also talk of the freezing north in ancient times. This is an excerp from the Avesta of the ancient Persians: “…At that time Airyana Vaejo had a pleasant climate, with 7 months of summer and only 5 months of winter. The forests were rich with game and the fields with grains. In the valleys many brooks flowed. This land however turned into a cursed land, where for 10 months it was winter and only 2 months was it summer, following the attacks of Ahra-Majnyu (the evil-devil).” This land could not have been Europe, since prior to the pole shift most of Europe was under ice or very cold, and only afterwards did it warm up.

The implications and consequences of a climate change of such magnitude must have had a tremendous effect, causing the decimation of populations in areas plunged into the arctic, due to the dying of plants and animals and the initial loss of food supply. It also caused the subsequent changes in a way of living and the great migrations away from a once hospitable original homeland for those that could still manage to escape. The initial places for this maximum climate change would have been in central Siberia, around 100 degree East longitude but it affected much of the north also. It is believed that the early FinnUgor nations during the Ice Age lived in what today is the Ukraine and as the ice receeded many of them moved north to scandinavia. A branch of them however then started moving east and crossed the northern part of the Ural mountains and spread all around it. Others mingling with the local indegenous people of the north east, such as the Samoyeds and others navigated much of the arctic and crossed into north America. Portions settled in the western states and California and are called the Penuitan language family. Special branches went further south into Yucatan and became the Maya indians. In the early phases these all had sizable ethnic elements which included the original north European caucasian types, not just the later mixed Siberian types.

Extent of the Euxine Lake or Black Sea 5500 BC

The time after the ice age was fairly warm even in the northern areas from 7300 to 5300BC it was hot and dry. Around 5,500BC another kind of catastrophy occurred. The flooding of the Black Sea . This was the “great flood”, as told by Sumerian legend, which was borrowed by later civilizations of early Mesopotamia and was eventually written down in the Bible. Those who were able to escape this flood fled from this once fertile lowlands, into Eastern Europe but the majority headed toward the warm climate of the south, to Mesopotamia. They founded the first recorded civilization of mankind, whose literature actually survived. Then from 5300 to 3000BC, following the Black Sea flood, it was wet and warm and is known as the W�rm period. After this it started to get continuously cold again in the north. Some groups trapped in this new harsh climate were so decimated by the freezing Siberian weather that they probably reverted to a primitive life style, which they could never hope to recover from in their new harsh surroundings.

–Alfred Hamori “The origin of the Sumerians and the great flood”

Other theories of pre-Sumerian peoples, the Natufians, believed to have created Gobekli Tepe, as well as Jericho, Abu Hureya and Neval Cori…

Read Full Post »